Aboriginal Art Market 2016

Date: 
Saturday, 3 December 2016 to Sunday, 4 December 2016
Time: 
10:00am to 4:00pm
Location: 
AIATSIS
51 Lawson Crescent, Acton
Australian Capital Territory
2601

AIATSIS is proud to host its fifth Indigenous Art Market Day at Acton Peninsula this December. This exciting opportunity brings original Aboriginal artworks from four remote Northern Territory communities including Beswick, Haasts Bluff (Ikuntji), Lajamanu and Yuendumu direct to Canberra.

There will be over a thousand unique pieces from a range of artists with merchandise prices starting at $25 and artworks starting at $120. All sale proceeds go directly back into the community art centres and to the artists.

Djilpin Arts is a not for profit organisation based in the remote community of Beswick. It was established in 2002 to maintain, develop and promote traditional and contemporary Indigenous visual and performing arts of the Katherine and Arnhem regions. Working in country with kin and culture across generations, their activities are rich in spirit, bringing healing to the community and linking traditional culture with modern enterprise.

Ikuntji Artists is a member-based, not for profit art centre. It is situated in the community of Haasts Bluff (Ikuntji), and has a board of seven Indigenous directors all of whom live and work locally. Haasts Bluff has a population of around 150 people. Ikuntji Artists is registered charity with both DGR and PBI status, which means you will receive tax back on all donations made.

Warnayaka Art Gallery artists from Lajamanu have been finalists in the Telstra National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art Awards. The artisans are highly skilled and their artworks are a mixture of dots and lines depicting subjects containing ceremony, law, culture, environment and society or Tjukurrpa dreaming.

Warlukurlangu Artists of Yuendumu is one of the longest running and most successful Aboriginal owned art centres in Central Australia. The artists are famous for colourful paintings and limited edition prints. Warlukulangu means ‘belong to fire’ in the local Warlpiri language.

Artwork: (no title provided) Artist: Julie Ashley (Djilpin Arts)

Julie was born on Elcho Island off the coast of Arnhem Land. She was taught to weave with pandanus and to collect the natural bush dyes by her mother. Julie has created a range of contemporary fibre artefacts such as lampshades, hats, mobiles and quirky animals including fish, turtles and dragonflies. She has also designed a scarf and created two limited edition screen prints. Julie has conducted weaving workshops in Canberra, Darwin and Beswick. As well as being an artist, Julie is an Arts Worker at Djilpin Arts in Beswick.

I went with my sisters Vera and Noreena to collect pandanus. When we come back we take all them rough stuff off and get the good pandanus. We boil it up with natural bush colour. My mother showed me when I was fourteen and I start learning for pandanus, string bag and dancing. I learn from other artists and get new ideas for myself. I like to make new things like dragonfly and fish, as well as traditional things like Mukuy and baskets.

Artwork: (no title provided) Artist: Julie Ashley (Djilpin Arts)
Artwork: (no title provided) Artist: Julie Ashley (Djilpin Arts)

Artwork: Yalka - Bush Onion Artist: Daphne Marks (Ikuntji Artists)

This painting shows the Yalka Dreaming (bush onion) which is situated in a place called Analy, close to Town Bore Outstation. Bush onions grow after the rain and are collected by all the women. The yalka are found underneath the surface and can be eaten raw or cooked in the hot sand next to the campfire. Painting referring to this Dreaming show diverse motifs such as plants, leaves, seeds, layers or roots. Canvas 77 x 122 cm

Artwork: Yalka - Bush Onion Artist: Daphne Marks (Ikuntji Artists)
Artwork: Yalka - Bush Onion Artist: Daphne Marks (Ikuntji Artists)

Artwork: Seed dreaming Artist: Rosie Tasman (Warnayaka Art Gallery)

Napurrurla is the older sister of Molly Napurrurla Tasman. They paint together in Lajamanu. Napurrurla is a tiny lady full of dynamic knowledge about her stories shown in the painting she creates. She is a caring dedicated lady who grew up in the Tanami Desert and walked along her story lines. Her depth of character and hardship she has endured has caused her to produce beautiful creations of Dreamtime using colourful bold linework and dots. Napurrurla is a hard working, busy person. Her love and dedication to Warlpiri Culture and family is born out in the art she creates. This art has been widely exhibited in Australia and overseas. She was a finalist in the 2010 Telstra National Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Art Awards. Major Collections: National Gallery of Victoria and Artbank.

This dreaming tells about the special seeds we use for grinding and making powder. The women add water to make a special damper. They put the damper in the coals for cooking. There are many different seeds we collect. The circles in this work are the ant holes. The ants are piling up the seeds and the ladies collect the seeds from the piles. The oblong shapes are coolamons. The half circles are the ladies collection the seeds which are then cleaned winnowed ground and baked into small seed cakes or bread. Grain was harvested all through the Tanami desert. Canvas Size 150 x 120 cm

Artwork: Seed dreaming Artist: Rosie Tasman (Warnayaka Art Gallery)
Artwork: Seed dreaming Artist: Rosie Tasman (Warnayaka Art Gallery)

Artwork: Jurlpu kuja kalu nyinami Yurntumu-wana (Birds that live around Yuendumu) Artist: Karen Napaljarri Barnes (Warlukurlangu Artists of Yuendumu)

This painting depicts one of many ‘jurlpu’ (bird) species that live around Yuendumu. The bush around Yuendumu provides many different habitats for birds to live in. Many bird species live around waterholes and rivers, like the ‘pirninypirninypa’ (black fronted dotterel [Elseyornis melanops]). Others live in the spinifex country, like the ‘nuwiyingki’ or ‘panngarra’ (cockatiel [Nymphicus hollandicus]). Still others make nests in trees, like the ‘juwayikirdi’ (grey crowned babbler [Pomatostomus temporalis]).

People hunt some of these species for meat. The most popular species to hunt today are the ‘yankirri’ (emu [Dromaius novaehollandiae]) and ‘wardilyka’ (bush turkey [Ardeotis australis]). People also used to hunt ‘yupurru’ (spinifex pigeon [Geophaps plumifera]) and ‘ngapilkiri’ (crested pigeon [Ocyphaps lophotes]), among others.

A number of bird species tell people messages. Several species tell people when rain is coming, including the ‘jintirr-jintirrpa’ (willy wagtail [Rhipidura leucophrys]) and ‘kalwa’ (crane). The cries of other birds, like the ‘kirrkalanji’ (brown falcon [Falco berigora]) and ‘ngamirliri’ (bush stone curlew [Burhinus grallarius]), can make children sick. The ‘paku-paku’ (crested bellbird [Oreoica gutturalis]) and ‘kurlukuku’ (diamond dove [Geopelia cuneata]) are messengers of love songs.

People also use messages from birds to help them hunt. The ‘juwayikirdi’ (grey crowned babbler [Pomatostomus temporalis]) and ‘piirn-piirnpa’ (yellow throated miner [Manorina flavigula]) cry when goannas are nearby. People know to run quickly when these birds cry, so that they can catch the goannas. In Warlpiri culture, ‘jurlpu’ (birds) are associated with a number of different ‘Jukurrpa’ (Dreaming) stories. Some are even associated with major ceremonies, including the Jardiwarnpa fire ceremony. Canvas Size 107 x 46 cm

Artwork: Jurlpu kuja kalu nyinami Yurntumu-wana (Birds that live around Yuendumu) Artist: Karen Napaljarri Barnes (Warlukurlangu Artists of Yuendumu)
Artwork: Jurlpu kuja kalu nyinami Yurntumu-wana (Birds that live around Yuendumu) Artist: Karen Napaljarri Barnes (Warlukurlangu Artists of Yuendumu)
Last reviewed: 7 Apr 2017